Einstein Rings.

So what are Einstein rings?  According to Wikipedia and Einstein ring is “the deformation of the light from a source (such as a galaxy or star) into a ring through gravitational lensing of the source’s light by an object with an extremely large mass (such as another galaxy, or a black hole)”

What?

The graphic above will make the definition a little easier to understand.  Basically, when everything is aligned correctly, the light that we see from certain object that pass around large gravity wells gets distorted into a ring.

This is kind of like an eclipse, but instead of blocking the light, the light is bent around an object.

File:Einstein Rings.jpg

Of course, Hubble has found a lot of these objects that were once only speculated by Einstein’s general theory of relativity.

\theta_E = \sqrt{\frac{4GM}{c^2}\;\frac{d_{LS}}{d_L d_S}},

Of course my math skills probably aren’t up to the task anymore.   Where did I put my physics books….

– Ex astris, scientia –

I am and avid amateur astronomer and intellectual property attorney in Pasadena, California and I am a Rising Star as rated by Super Lawyers Magazine.  As a former Chief Petty Officer in the U.S. Navy, I am a proud member of the Armed Service Committee of the Los Angeles County Bar Association working to aid all active duty and veterans in our communities. Connect with me on Google +

Norman

Einstein in Space.

The European Space Agency (ESA) launched an Automated Transfer Vehicle-4 (ATV-4) to resupply the International Space Station today.  In honor of the most famous physicist of all time, the ESA named the craft “Albert Einstein.”

Albert lifted off from Europe’s spaceport in Kourou, French Guiana on June 5, 2013.  Albert  is the fourth of five planned ISS resupply trips.

The three previous ATVs were named for Jules Verne, Johannes Kepler and Edoardo Amaldi.

Ariane 5 VA213 carrying ATV Albert Einstein lifted off from Europe’s Spaceport in French Guiana at 21:52 GMT on June 5, 2013. Credit: ESA/Arianspace.

ATV-4 will take a leisurely 10 days to reach the station, with docking scheduled for June 15.

I wonder what the real Albert would think?

– Ex astris, scientia –

I am and avid amateur astronomer and intellectual property attorney in Pasadena, California. As a former Chief Petty Officer in the U.S. Navy, I am a proud member of the Armed Service Committee of the Los Angeles County Bar Association working to aid all active duty and veterans in our communities. Connect with me on Google +

Norman

General Motors Off the Hook in Albert Einstein Right of Publicity Lawsuit

General Motors has successfully defended a right of publicity lawsuit over its use of the image of Albert Einstein in a 2009 advertisement. The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, which controls Einstein’s rights of publicity, had alleged that GM was not authorized to use his likeness. It sued General Motors for trademark infringement, unfair competition, and violation of California’s right of publicity statute.

The advertisement for the GMC Terrain SUV featured Einstein’s face on top of a muscular man with an “e=mc ” tattoo. The tagline below the image stated, “Ideas are sexy too.” It appeared once in People magazine.

While U.S. District Court Judge Judge A. Howard Matz agreed that the ad was likely in poor taste, he ultimately concluded that it was not illegal.

With regard to the duration of rights to publicity, which can vary under state law, Judge Matz concluded that publicity rights should have an expiration date. “A maximum duration of 50 years appropriately reflects the balance between meaningful enforcement of the right of publicity after a famous individual’s death and the public’s interest in free expression,” he ruled. Under this analysis, Hebrew University’s right to sue terminated in 2005.

As Matz further explained, Einstein is “the symbol and embodiment of genius. His persona has become thoroughly ingrained in our cultural heritage. Now, nearly 60 years after his death, that persona should be freely available to those who seek to appropriate it as part of their own expression, even in tasteless ads.”

How Can I Help?

A trademark can be a valuable asset and it needs protection.  If you need help to your protect brand, file a trademark application, or know someone that can use my help, please contact me for a free 30 minute consultation at nvantreeck@usip.com or call TOLL FREE at 1-855-UR IDEAS (1-855-874-3327) and ask for Norman.

– Ex astris, scientia –

I am and avid amateur astronomer and intellectual property attorney in Pasadena, California. As a former Chief Petty Officer in the U.S. Navy, I am a proud member of the Armed Service Committee of the Los Angeles County Bar Association working to aid all active duty and veterans in our communities. Connect with me on Google +

Norman

I found one using BEER!

For about the last decade, exoplanets have been found using one of two methods: radial velocity (looking for wobbling stars) and transits (looking for dimming stars).

Now, Tel Aviv University and the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA) have discovered a new exoplanet using a new method that relies on Einstein’s special theory of relativity and data from the Kepler Space Telescope.  The planet was identified using the BEER algorithm (relativistic BEaming, Ellipsoidal, and Reflection/emission modulations).

Contrary to popular belief, BEER was developed by Professor Tsevi Mazeh and his student, Simchon Faigler, at Tel Aviv University, Israel (not in Egypt in the 5th century B.C.).

The BEER method looks for three small effects that occur simultaneously as a planet orbits the star.  Einstein’s “beaming” effect causes the star to brighten as it moves toward us, tugged by the planet, and dim as it moves away. The brightening results from photons “piling up” in energy, as well as light getting focused in the direction of the star’s motion due to relativistic effects.

“This is the first time that this aspect of Einstein’s theory of relativity has been used to discover a planet,” said co-author Tsevi Mazeh of Tel Aviv University.

“Einstein’s planet,” formally known as Kepler-76b, is a “hot Jupiter” that orbits its star every 1.5 days. Its diameter is about 25 percent larger than Jupiter and it weighs twice as much. It orbits a type F star located about 2,000 light-years from Earth in the constellation Cygnus.

The planet is tidally locked to its star, always showing the same face to it, like Mecury.  As a result, Kepler-76b broils at a temperature of about 3,600 degrees Fahrenheit.

– Ex astris, scientia –

I am and avid amateur astronomer and intellectual property attorney in Pasadena, California. As a former Chief Petty Officer in the U.S. Navy, I am a proud member of the Armed Service Committee of the Los Angeles County Bar Association working to aid all active duty and veterans in our communities. Connect with me on Google +

Norman